It’s a good thing Natalee Holloway was pretty

Sammy Kershaw has a country song called, “She don’t know she’s beautiful”, and it’s likely Natalee Holloway doesn’t have any idea of the fuss surrounding her disappearance.
For those of you who have recently awakened from a long coma, Holloway is the 18-year-old blond bombshell from Alabama who got drunk with some friends while on a senior trip to Aruba in May, got into a car with some foreign strangers, and (shock of shocks) has been missing ever since.
The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children claims that 2,000 children are reported missing every day (www.safefoundation.com/fbi_missing_kids.htm, www.missingkids.com/). Holloway’s been missing since May 30, so on average that’s about 100,000 children (NOT COUNTING ADULTS!) who’ve been REPORTED missing since Holloway.
Karl Rove and Bush’s Supreme Court nominee, John Roberts, have thankfully crept into the headlines. But prior to the events that put them in the spotlight, Fox News Channel’s prime-time news commentary shows were devoting up to 40 minutes a night to this young lady.
Natalee Holloway. Elizabeth Smart (Utah girl whose parents hired a vagrant off the street who eventually kidnapped their daughter). Jessica Lunsford (Florida girl later found to have been buried alive by a convicted sex offender). Notice anything about those three headline-grabbers? Color me cynical, but they’re all attractive, young white females. And when someone actually posed this question to Sean Hannity on “Hannity & Colmes” recently, he actually had the gall to reply that they were simply giving the public what it wanted.
They CREATED this market by turning Holloway into a pseudo-celebrity, just like they did with the other pretty white girls. According to the NCMEC, in 1999, there were 797,500 children reported missing. That’s 2,185 a day! Two thousand other children have gone missing EVERY DAY since Holloway, and the media have the audacity to think Holloway warrants more than a footnote? Each of these prime-time “news” shows could devote one segment to missing children every night and NEVER have to repeat material.
Sometimes I think they should have a missing-children channel on cable, which would cycle pictures of adults and children along with some basic information on them. They could divide the country into regions to help pare down the sheer volume of data that is probably out there.
I don’t have children, but if I do, I hope they’re beautiful so the media will care enough to plaster their picture all over TV if they ever go missing.

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